Author Topic: Tank Repair  (Read 152 times)

Offline Graeme

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Tank Repair
« on: November 13, 2020, 08:04:41 PM »
Hi All

In short, I need a tank. The one I have has had multiple repairs, lining, soldering etc. The costs if you can find one, are exorbitant. And second hand so may be in worse condition that the one I currently have.

So, question?

Splitting the tank open longitudinally, carry out repairs that need to be done on the internal, then welding back up, add liner which will protect against corrosion in the internal side of the weld.?

The problem is, I can't imagine there not being a seam along the surgery.

Mine is a 1985 Model dual shock. I believe that the design was changed after 1981 to accommodate the new electronics.

I was also told that the a) R80 tank is the same & that b) Royal Enfield are making "new" tanks for the older BMW range. I can't find anything on the net regarding b).

Thanks

1985 R65 LS

Offline Justin B.

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2020, 11:40:53 PM »
Maybe boil it out really good with Muriatic acid then use an epoxy based tank liner?  Caswell Plating has a kit that might work for you:

https://caswellplating.com/epoxy-gas-tank-sealer.html
Justin B.

2004 BMW R1150RT
1981 R100RT - Summer bike, NEKKID!!!

Offline Tony Smith

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2020, 01:21:40 AM »
Justin, I use Muratic (hydrochloric) acid myself to clean bolts and substantial steel parts.
BUT I consider it far to fierce, even when watered down, to use on rusty fuel tanks.

I prefer to use Citric acid as on the whole it is good at eating rust without being too aggressive about it.

I agree that an epoxy liner is best for a tank that the rust works have been at. Although I do use a membrane liner (Redkote) when replacing a liner on good steel.

Over the years 😊 have either used myself, or watched others use, just about every liner system around. In my opinion the very best of them is Red, White & Blue. Best of all, from my point of view, it is an Australian product.

Product details and videos at www.redwhiteandblue.com.au


1978 R100RS| 1981 R100RS (JPS) | 1984 R65 | 1992 KLE500 | 2002 R1150GSA |

Offline Graeme

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2020, 06:38:33 AM »
thanks guys. The red white and blue looks good. But, as I mentioned, it has been lined. Can or does it need to be removed prior to the treatment?
1985 R65 LS

Offline georgesgiralt

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2020, 08:59:35 AM »
Hello,
The fuel stove in the house at the mountain has developed a lot of pin leaks from condensation and no use for a long time.
I just finished sealing them by using a two component Loctite Epoxy glue the seller says it hold very well on metal and is impervious to many chemicals including Diesel fuel (which is what the heater uses). It is the Loctite EA3423.
The product itself is relatively cheap but if you have to buy the special hand gun to press on the tube, it is expensive...
So far, the tank hold 5 liter Diesel with no leak...
It may be useful to seal the tank from the outside ! (my tank was "beyond repair" said the guy I asked to solder it...)

Offline Justin B.

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2020, 12:04:14 PM »
Tony - never tried Citric Acid before other than to dissolve a broken drill bit in stainless steel, I'll keep it in mind.  I used muriatic acid on my R100 tank and it worked great.  I poured in a gallon, plugged up all of the openings, then just rotated it through the course of a day and it took out all of the liner, rust, everything - all that was left was grey steel!  I then used the POR-15 liner since there were no holes and so far, so good.

Graeme - IMO all of the old liner needs to come off especially if any of it is starting to flake off or separate.
Justin B.

2004 BMW R1150RT
1981 R100RT - Summer bike, NEKKID!!!

Offline Tony Smith

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2020, 06:27:59 PM »
Grahame, any previous liner. Were to have any loose bits removed, complete removal is not required and with a tank in poor co digital n trying for complete removal is likely to cause more damage.

1978 R100RS| 1981 R100RS (JPS) | 1984 R65 | 1992 KLE500 | 2002 R1150GSA |

Offline Bob_Roller

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2020, 07:29:30 PM »
I used citric acid on one R65 fuel tank and it worked great .
The other ones, I used vinegar, one with 10% acid, it did a good job as well, but took longer to dissolve the rust .
I've used POR-15 on the three tanks and 10 years later still no issues .
'81 R65
'82 R65 LS ?
'84 R65 LS
'87 Moto Guzzi V65 Lario
'02 R1150R
Riding all year long since 1993 .
I'll give up my R65, when they pry my cold dead hands from the handlebars !!!!!

Offline Graeme

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Re: Tank Repair
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2020, 07:36:46 PM »
From the Cresswell Website as per Justin's post:-"When recoating your gas tank from failed Kreem or POR-15 tank sealers, remove the old, failed coating using a paint stripper containing Methylene Chloride."

This project looks like it might be a lot of fun.  :)

1985 R65 LS